BLOG


Did you know that Wednesday of this week was Registered Dietitians Day? I wanted to take time to acknowledge our wonderful team of dietitians at Chrysalis because every day feels like RD day to us; quite literally, we could not do our jobs without them!

All professional practice guidelines for eating disorder treatment state that a multidisciplinary team approach, which includes nutritional care with a registered dietitian, is the gold standard. In addition, the Joint Commission actually requires any organization that is accredited for the treatment of eating disorders (which Chrysalis is) to provide nutritional assessment and “nutritional rehabilitation” to their patients. Furthermore, all disciplines within the field of mental health (psychology, social work, and professional counseling) have a portion of their ethics code that addresses scope of practice. This means that any therapist who treats eating disorders (or other medical conditions requiring nutritional counseling) has to be referring to and collaborating with a registered dietitian in order to be complying with their ethics. Simply put, mental health clinicians are not allowed to treat what we aren’t trained in!

While all our dietitians are extremely competent in treating eating disorders, they each have unique specialties they offer to diversify the nutrition services we can offer at Chrysalis. Chaundra Evans, RD, LDN, CEDRD-S is also an expert in the care of weight loss surgery patients and is certified in adult weight management. She offers a compassionate, non-diet approach to those with binge eating disorder, emotional eating, and medical conditions due to obesity. Chaundra is an outstanding public speaker who has presented locally, regionally, and nationally on topics related to eating disorder treatment and bariatrics.

Terri Mozingo, RD, LDN, CEDRD is the Director of Nutrition for our Intensive Outpatient Program, chosen for this role because of her wealth of experience treating eating disorders at higher levels of care, including inpatient settings. She is especially passionate about working with patients with complex medical issues given her background in hospital-based nutrition. Terri is also an expert in pediatric nutrition, treating children and adolescents with a wide variety of presenting concerns and is certified in child and adolescent weight management. She provides education to kids and their parents to offer a non-diet, shame-free approach to treating pediatric obesity.

Sarah Voegtle, RD, LDN, CSSD rounds out our team with expertise in sports nutrition and food allergies, holding specialized certifications in both areas. Sarah has extensive knowledge and is passionate about offering nutritional counseling and eating disorder treatment to military service members and their loved ones, having previously worked on Camp Lejeune with this population. She is also an integral member of our Intensive Outpatient team, providing nutrition groups and meal groups in that program.

It is often a misconception that a client has to be in therapy at Chrysalis to see one of our dietitians. All three of our team members accept outside referrals and gladly collaborate with any referring party, whether it be a mental health clinician or a medical provider. In addition, to participate in our IOP, a patient does not have to see one of our dietitians individually; our nutrition director will communicate with any outpatient dietitian to ensure that a participant’s meal plan is being met.

Chrysalis Center’s mission is to offer expert level, integrative, evidence-based treatment to all of our clients. Hopefully after reading this, you see why our dynamic group of RDs is crucial to the success of our program and to healthy outcomes for our clients. Thanks Chaundra, Terri, and Sarah for all you do! Learn more about our dietitians here.

 

Kelly Broadwater, LPA, LPC, CEDS-S is the founder and executive director of Chrysalis Center. A certified eating disorders specialist, she has had the privilege of working side by side with registered dietitians her entire career.



For as long as I can remember, my life has been directed by two things: My weight and food. I always wanted to be thin because in my mind thinness was equal to acceptance. As a little girl, I constantly compared myself to my friends. I was never the “skinniest” and I hated that. At age 11, I went on my first diet with my mother. I lost weight very quickly, and people took notice. The compliments were addictive…” Wow, Sarah you look so good” ….” Someone is losing their baby fat” ….” Sarah is really coming into her own” … I was hooked. I’d never felt such confirmation. And so, I started my new life as a “dieter.” I tried all the fad diets and my weight yo-yoed for years. My relationship with food was horrible. My relationship with the scale was even worse.

By my fifteenth birthday all thoughts and actions revolved around food. The servings on my plate were tiny and I would run for miles a day to burn off what little calories I consumed. I was officially out of control. My clothes hung off me, my periods stopped completely; I looked skeletal. My mother took me to my pediatrician for my yearly exam and he exclaimed “if you continue like this you are going to die. “He urged my mother to seek professional help for me immediately.  I agreed to go to treatment and my mother set an appointment with my very first therapist.

She was sweet, but not very knowledgeable about eating disorders. She did not ask me to meet with a nutritionist. Instead, she and my parents developed a plan to fill the home with candy, cakes, chips, anything I used to eat that was full of calories and unfortunately lacking nutrients. I wanted to succeed in treatment. I have always been a people-pleaser and wanted to make my parents proud. I ate what was asked of me and more. I carried around a book bag full of chips, snack cakes and chocolate. This is how I learned to binge. I would eat all day. Many times, to a point of extreme discomfort. My parents were elated. My therapist praised me for my efforts. It was not long after my weight restored that I was considered “recovered”. My weight was back to normal, so all was well, right? My therapist and parents agreed I was “cured” and no longer in need of treatment….so I stopped going….

….and I continued to binge. I learned it could be just as mind-numbing as restriction. My weight climbed to a point that was unhealthy for me. I felt totally out of control. My eating disorder told me I could take it back by purging. This took various forms: either by restriction, over-exercise or making myself throw up. For years and years, I found myself in a binge/restriction cycle. Over time I assumed it was normal; and because I did not look emaciated my behaviors went unquestioned. This is how I lived for most of my life. I was detached and isolated. As far as I was concerned, this was good enough.

Time went by and I lived my life, but I was bound by the rules set by my eating disorder.  A few years after I got married my husband and I decided we wanted to try to have a baby. I had a very difficult time getting pregnant. At the time I could not see the correlation between my weight and infertility. I assumed I was unable to get pregnant without medical intervention. I started fertility meds and eventually got pregnant. At first, I thought I would be fine, that my maternal instincts would over-come my disorder. Certainly, I would be fine with the weight gain for the sake of my baby, I thought.

How wrong I was.

I found myself in a very dangerous place after I conceived. I lost weight my first trimester due to morning sickness and something inside me snapped. Terrified of weight gain, I became very restrictive. I could not eat what I needed to sustain a healthy pregnancy. Around my third month of pregnancy I realized what a bad situation I was in. I spoke to my doctor about the severity of my situation. She told me about a program in Wilmington that specifically treated eating disorders. She referred me to Chrysalis, thank God.

I started to see a therapist and nutritionist regularly. I was amazed at the difference in this treatment episode! They were so knowledgeable and capable! For the first time in my life, I felt understood, I felt hope.

I would love to say that I was immediately healed and gained the weight recommended for a healthy pregnancy, but anorexia is a very powerful disease. I was still underweight when I gave birth. I was anemic throughout my pregnancy and was very thin. Thankfully, I carried my son to term and he was born at a healthy weight. We were very lucky.

When my son was born I was determined to breastfeed which made meeting my treatment goals very difficult.  Over-whelmed with caring for a newborn, I clung to my disorder for comfort. After months of this with no improvement I realized I may need a higher level of care. I spoke to my nutritionist about inpatient…but after we spoke I realized going away would mean being away from my precious baby for months. I would miss his first words, his first steps. But then I had a thought that turned out to be the reality check I needed: I was going to miss out on all those things and so much more if I didn’t step it up in treatment.

 

So, I did the work. I pushed myself even when I thought I had nothing to give. Little by little I started making progress. I learned to cope with my disorder. I gained tools, faced my fears, and rediscovered who I am without anorexia. One day my nutritionist told me about a film called “Embrace.” It taught me about appreciating my body for what it can do rather than what it looks like. I never thought about it that way. I’d always seen my body as purely ornamental. I can now appreciate and love my body for its capabilities! For the first time in my life I am living!  I am eternally grateful to my counselor, my nutritionist, and the Chrysalis Center. They played a monumental part in helping me get my life back. In the past two years I have started to learn to love myself unconditionally. There are no words to express the value in that. I will continue to push myself and work toward a life that is free from my disorder because it is worth it! I am worth it!

 



Today’s story comes from a man who wants to take an opportunity to share his journey regarding how his obsession with nutrition became one of his life’s struggles and how he was able to overcome the issues that developed.

Growing up as a kid, athletic performance was at the very top of my life’s priority list.  I was taught that dedication and extreme discipline would allow me to separate myself from my peers and help me reach greater goals.  These principles proved to be true as I saw success in high school and college athletics.  After college, I no longer had competitive basketball to fulfill my drive, so I turned to a focus on working out and weight lifting.  I had always lifted weights but now I was doing it for different reason.  Previously, the motivation was performance based, but now there was more of an aesthetic motivation.  I implemented my dedicated and disciplined characteristics into this endeavor and found that nutrition played a huge role in helping to meet my goals.  Soon enough, the “health” component would prove to be the unhealthiest aspect of this hobby.  I became obsessed with every calorie and I wouldn’t let myself deviate, even the slightest bit.  Additionally, my friends and family came to admire this level of discipline, adding pressure to my situation.  I felt like I had a reputation to uphold as everyone was looking to me for nutrition and advice on health.  As this situation progressed, an important observation should be noted – my performance, mood, and energy all began to suffer, creating even more of a toxic situation.  Eventually, I caved.  One Sunday afternoon, I ate more calories in 6 hours than I typically would in 3 days.  The psychological effects from this binge were the worst part.  This continued on and off for a little less than a year.  During that time, food began to take over the majority of my thoughts and I felt imprisoned – it was awful.  I was constantly in a state where I was either trying to undo the damage from a binge by frantically working out for hours, or I was in continuous thought about how I would prevent the next binge.  In due course, I sought professional help and learned how to prevent these binges, but more importantly I learned how to relieve my mind from obsessing about food.

I spared a lot of details, but I wanted to share this quick story for a few different reasons.  I think it’s important that people realize that eating disorders can affect people of all different shapes and sizes.  I was doing my worst, when I was physically looking my best.  I was striving for “perfection” while I should’ve been striving for balance.  Since altering my mindset, I have been much happier and healthier physically and mentally.  Also, I can’t stress enough, the importance of seeking help.  Understanding the how and why wouldn’t have been possible without the assistance of someone who had professional experience in this space.   I encourage anyone who is struggling to seek guidance – every problem has a solution!



Our story today comes from a woman who shows us that recovery is a journey that IS possible. Are you ready to start your journey to recovery

 

NEDA week has finally arrived, and this year, the initiative is “Come As You Are.”  When I take a closer look at the theme, my focus is drawn to the action word that begins the phrase, “come.”  To me, recovery is largely about action.  A wise therapist once told me that to get different results, you have to do different things…aka make changes.  Easier said than done when most people, including myself, would rather spend decades deciphering ancient hieroglyphics than change.  So, why do it?  What’s the point of recovery?  And really, what is this fabled recovery?

 

To understand what recovery truly is, I believe that we have to take a serious inventory.  Don’t worry, you will not be subject to any management accounting quizzes.  By inventory, I mean more of a self-analysis.  A lot of people share what recovery is like for them, discussing what they have endured and how life is better for them now, after achieving recovery.  But I have trouble translating others’ stories in to something tangible for me.  Their experience is theirs, my life is mine.

 

This is where the inventory comes in handy.  Recovery is meaningless unless it applies to you, so make it applicable to you.  Honestly analyze all aspects of your day, your life, your health and your physical/emotional/mental well-being.  Caution: self-analysis takes work, and time (therapy is critical here)…but again, we can’t make worthwhile changes unless we have an accurate understanding of what we have, and what we need.

 

Once you have a clear inventory, aka a snapshot of your current status, you can be really truthful with yourself.  Think: is this what I want for myself?  Am I happy?  Do I feel good?  How do I relate to people around me?  Are there limits I need to enact anywhere?   Am I setting myself up for meaningful connection with others, and myself?  Only you can answer these, and many other questions.  The answers then become the bedrock for your recovery and your why.

 

Your “why” is your motivation, your reason(s) for making adjustments.  And it’s OK if your why morphs over time.  It’s yours…it can be whatever you want.  But make sure it’s something that you can cling to during challenges.  This is the logic behind taking action, making change, coming as you are…you aren’t going to do it unless you have a strong reason why and an understanding of what needs to be done.

 

Turning away from an eating disorder is slow, grueling work.  Day after day, hour after hour, decisions must be made that either align with your why, or not.  Recovery for me is an in-the-trenches process where I force myself to choose the path that’s parallel with my why, NOT the eating disorder.  I have to be gritty and stubborn and remain focused on the foundation of my new actions.  It helps to ask for help, to be surrounded by support and reminded that I’m not alone, because I’m not.  The first step, along with every subsequent step, has to start with you.  You have to come as you are, and you definitely can.  Choose life, I promise that it’s worth it.

 

 



Today we share the second client story in the series for National Eating Disorder Awareness Week where we are asked to “Come As You Are” to share stories about all types of eating disorders. 

Three stays and three diagnoses later (anorexia, EDNOS, and bulimia) and I am here to tell the tale. Why? I am not sure, but by the grace of God. It has been a long battle. One that still isn’t over. But as I am now, I can promise it gets better with time, distance, and healing.

 

I don’t really know where to begin. I guess the beginning would make sense but that goes way back. To paint a clear picture I’ll start in middle school. The other kids are outside at recess. I am stuck in the classroom pushing food around which I dare not eat. You see, the teachers and my parents have already had the conversation. The one that says “your daughter isn’t eating.” I’m in the middle of a long, serious, battle with anorexia. At the time I would not confess nor admit it to myself and certainly not to anyone else. This battle continues for years on end. Fast forward. I am 18-yrs-old. I walk through the doors at Chrysalis, terrified. There I am officially diagnosed. Fast forward again. I just graduated college at age 22. Time for a long seven-month inpatient stay at a treatment center. Tubes come and go, and finally I am released. Mentally still really struggling but physically going through the motions of being okay. It doesn’t last though. I ship off again. This time to a place called Castlewood for six months, but who is counting? Again, I go through the motions. Even begin to heal. Again, I become sick. I go back. Third time’s the charm? I hope so.

Now, I walk through the doors at Chrysalis, but not because I am starving, purging, working out to the point of exhaustion, or using a multitude of other negative coping strategies. I walk through the doors not because all I can think about is food and calories; I walk through those doors because I want life rather than mere existence. I want to be the best version of myself possible. I want to be a better woman than I was yesterday. And, I want to understand yesterday’s pain more deeply. I walk through those doors not because I am isolated and all alone. I walk in because I have so many dear friends who are in the battle, too. So many beautiful souls, who like me, do not deserve the cards they have been dealt.

Life isn’t fair or easy. But I am glad I have life. Now, on the bad days I skip meals and fight with my wardrobe. On the good days, I am truly learning to love myself inside and out. I am still waiting for the body image piece to get better. I believe it will. Everything else has. I am no longer anxious every time I sit down to eat. I no longer just go through the motions. Hell, sometimes I even enjoy food. I smile and mean it. I use my voice over my actions to tell people when I am not okay. And I am proud of myself for how far I’ve come. And so, I come through those doors as I am. Not as I was. Nothing more, nothing less than I am here and now. That’s all I can do. I invite you to do the same.



Chrysalis Center is proud to participate in National Eating Disorders Awareness (NEDA) Week again this year. Every year, the last week of February, NEDA strives to create awareness about all forms of eating disorders in an effort to promote healing, provide resources and education, and to help the general public become more aware of the spectrum of eating disorders so those suffering from the disease can find a path to full recovery.  

This year’s theme is “Come As You Are”. NEDA wants all those who have or had an eating disorder to have a voice and share stories, so we are happy to provide a platform for people to do that. This week – we will share stories written by clients who want to help others. Just like eating disorders come in all shapes, sizes, ages, ethnicities, so will our stories. Do you have a story to share? Has your journey just begun? If you need help along the way, please contact our office and we’ll be happy to help you find your path to recovery.

MY ED STORY

Journey is often described as an act of traveling from one place to another.  What you are about to read is my personal journey of overcoming my eating disorder.  I remember the first time I sat down with a professional, I told them that I didn’t have an eating disorder but that sometimes I stress eat.  That statement is so far from what I know now to be true.  I was at a point in my life where binge eating had consumed my emotions; my every thought; and, controlled most of my decisions.  What was I going to have at this meal?  Would I have enough food to last me through the work day?  I’m stressed, so I “need” to eat this to help me calm down.  These never ending thoughts held me captive for so long, and I didn’t even realize it at that point in time.  I had tried all the “diets” and exercise programs to help me become a healthier version of myself.  All it led me to was more binge eating, more shame and guilt, and a lower sense of self worth.

When I started seeking help, I was numb emotionally, but open minded and motivated to change.  Meeting with the registered dietitian completely changed my life, and I am so grateful for it.  Lesson 1: add a grain to my meal.  Lesson 2: add a vegetable or fruit to my meal.  I thought, “alright, how hard can that be?”  Slowly, but surely each lesson I learned created a foundation that is now my plan for living and eating mindfully each meal of the day.   Upon each lesson, I was able to gain confidence and control with what I was eating.

When I started, I would think, “well I’m not giving up this or I’m not giving up that” and the dietitian would say, “I’m not asking you to, I just want to try this or this.”  This mindset was life changing for me because it took away the “all or nothing” and “black or white” principles I had been living within my whole life.  Over time, I was able to shift my mindset to become more forgiving when I ate something that didn’t make my body feel as good, feel less guilty about enjoying a brownie or cookie for a friend’s birthday, and live an overall healthier lifestyle in which my body felt good and enabled me to do more things physically.

I remember one morning recently eating a fast food breakfast biscuit while I was on the road. While I didn’t have any guilt or shame, I found that I missed the fruits and grains that were in my day-to-day routine and that I actually preferred these newfound foods that didn’t exist within my day-to-day prior to overcoming my eating disorder.  Throughout my sessions, my dietitian also assisted me with figuring out that tomato based sauce was contributing to my IBS.  So we tried switching me to white sauce pizza which made a huge impact on decreasing my IBS symptoms, and the amount I have to take my medication for these symptoms decreased significantly.  I also found that this mindfulness and flexibility from within my food choices started flowing over into other areas of my life, so I began enjoying exercise, because I did it my way by taking classes that were my style rather than following what society told me I had to do or should be doing.   It also led me to feel my emotions (both pleasant and unpleasant) when I had been masking them for so long by eating them away.  The ability to actually feel, process, and manage my emotions more effectively allowed me to grow into and become my true self within my personal life.

I am now recovered from my eating disorder, but I am still involved with counseling and nutrition guidance so that I can maintain living my healthiest mind, body, and soul.  The journey can be long, rocky, trying, confusing, and overwhelming, but what I can say is that when you stick with it and find your peace, it is so freeing.  You gain a clarity that is beyond what you would ever imagine.



Loving yourself can seem like an impossible task because we are really good at judging ourselves. We judge and criticize our looks, what we say, how we feel, how we act. In fact, we usually wouldn’t say our darkest thoughts about ourselves to our worst enemy. Some of these thoughts we may have even had since we were a kid. It almost seems as though it’s hardwired into our brain. But how we treat ourselves makes a big difference to our overall health. So where do you start? How do you start to love yourself?

Compassion. Having compassion for ourselves can decrease depression, anxiety, and even shame. Before practicing for yourself, I invite you to think about an experience where you have had compassion for someone else. What did compassion look like? You don’t have to have the same experience as someone to recognize and empathize with their suffering. When someone is suffering, our compassion towards them allows us to respond with kindness, with care and without judgement. It allows us to understand what they are going through regardless of their failures or mistakes. Compassion allows a space for human connection with someone which is what we’re all really looking for, right?

 

Self-compassion is the exact same thing but turned on to ourselves; having kindness and understanding for your suffering, without judgement or criticism. It also includes being kind and understanding to yourself, even when you fail or make a mistake. It allows a space for a genuine connection to yourself. Next time you experience suffering or emotional distress, instead of judging yourself, try finding compassion. Maybe you put your hand on

your heart or say some phrase of understanding and kindness. Maybe you treat yourself to something nice, or even simply allow yourself a space to feel the emotions you’re feeling. When in doubt, think about what you would say or do if someone you love came to you when they were suffering, and then do it for yourself!

We are all human, we all have short-comings and we all deserve compassion. We deserve compassion from others, and from ourselves. This Valentine’s Day I invite everyone to open your heart to yourself and celebrate your common humanity.

 

For more information about Self-Compassion and how to practice:

https://self-compassion.org

https://chrisgermer.com

 

 

 

Kaitlyn Patterson, MA, LPA is a mental health therapist at Chrysalis Center who helps her clients learn to be compassionate toward themselves as they find recovery. To schedule your first appointment with Kaitlyn, call our office at (910) 790-9500 today.


Sarah Voegtle
25/Mar/2019

Disordered Eating in the Military

For just over 4 years, I worked as a dietitian for military members (and their families) on one of the largest Marine bases in the world.  I was and am honored to work with this unique and special population.  Just a few months after I started that job, I realized that disordered eating ran rampant among these men and women in uniform. My eating disorder (ED) patient load became so large that I knew that I had to get additional knowledge and training to ensure these folks were getting the best care possible. You see, not all dietitians specialize in eating disorders.  It is a very specialized field of nutrition that requires additional education to ensure competency in treatment.

Unfortunately, there is only outdated and limited research about eating disorder prevalence and treatment in service members. This may be in part because many wouldn’t want to actively admit disordered eating due to the possible consequences.  In my experience, many of those who came forward to seek help were also administratively separated (honorably discharged)- if these service members wanted to continue to serve their country this would be a good reason to keep their mouths shut.  That being said, we do know that military members are six times more likely to have an eating disorder than their civilian counterparts. We also know that Marines are affected more than other branches but likely because they have the most stringent physical fitness tests (PFTs) and weight standards. Don’t get me wrong, though, all of the branches of the military suffer from an increase of disordered eating and eating disorders.

So why the higher numbers in service members? Well, there isn’t great research on that. My professional and personal opinion would point to a multi-factorial cause:

  • Trauma – people who have experienced trauma (whether physical, emotional or sexual) in their lives are at a greater risk for developing an eating disorder
  • Control – when a person is in the military, they are pretty much owned by the government. They have no control over their day to day lives (at least not like civilians do). The eating disorder could be a way to maintain control in a world where nothing else can be.
  • Perfectionism – some have hypothesized that the things that make up a good soldier are the exact same things that can breed eating disorders. Perfectionism is praised in the military – even receiving higher/better evaluations for better fitness scores.
  • Body-shaming – in many instances I treated patients who were shamed by their higher-ups. Unfortunately, this is very common. These patients would often be referred to as “fat bodies” (a not so endearing term that military members use to label someone they feel is out of regulations).
  • Unrealistic standards – the military measures body fat with the “tape method”- an non-researched and inaccurate measuring of different body parts where those measurements get put into a formula that spit out a certain body fat percentage. Research has shown that this is an inaccurate way to measure body fat when compared with gold standard of DXA or underwater weighing. Unfortunately, being able to use these gold standard methods would be too costly, thus the military continues to measure body fat with the “tape method”.
  • Misinformation – many military members look to their recruiters (prior to joining) or their chain of command to see how to get into shape and/or lose weight. Disordered eating methods are so prevalent, unfortunately, because many of these folks have experience with trying to cut weight fast for a weigh-in. (Remember if standards aren’t met, they’ll get kicked out of the military).

As previously noted, I think that there are many reasons that military members are at higher risk and have a higher prevalence for ED. The real concern, however, is the need for these patients to get the specialized care for their eating disorder. Often, patients are sent to the closest dietitian or therapist when he/she may not be the most appropriate in treating the disorder.  If you are a service member, or know someone who is who suffers from ED, remember to advocate for your health; find a local specialist in disordered eating so that you can get the best treatment possible.

Sarah Voegtle, MS, RD, CSSD, LDN is a registered dietitian specializing in eating disorder and sports nutrition. If you’re ready to get specialized treatment and any nutrition needs, contact Chrysalis Center at (910) 790-9500 to schedule your initial appointment with Sarah. 

 



As the new year approaches, many people start thinking about making resolutions. The practice of setting resolutions actually dates back 4000 years. During a massive 12-day religious festival, the Babylonians crowned a new king or reaffirmed their loyalty to the reigning king. They also made promises to the gods to pay their debts and return any objects they had borrowed. The ancient Romans began each year by making promises to the god Janus, for whom the month of January is named.

With thousands of years of practice, you’d think we’d be better at achieving resolutions. The reality is, while 45% of people make resolutions only 8% of them achieve them, with 80% of resolutions “failing” by the second week of February. Why set yourself up to feel bad in five weeks or less? A more effective practice, taken from Acceptance and Commitment Therapy, would be to set values-based goals.

Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a type of research-supported therapy that uses acceptance and mindfulness strategies, together with commitment and behavior change strategies, to increase psychological flexibility. Psychological flexibility means connecting to the present moment fully and changing or persisting in behavior in the service of chosen values. Many of the groups offered at Chrysalis are based in ACT.

According to ACT, the first step, before any goal setting is to clarify what value(s) is (are) underlying your goals. Studies have compared goal setting alone, versus goal setting plus values clarification, and found that those who identified their values actually performed better.

Once you have selected values that are important to you, make sure you set a SMART goal. There are different versions of this acronym, but in the iteration used in The Happiness Trap by Russ Harris (a leading expert in ACT therapy), SMART stands for:

•Specific: specify the actions you will take, when and where you will do so, and who or what is involved.

•Meaningful: The goal should be personally meaningful to you. If it is genuinely guided by your values, as opposed to following a rigid rule, or trying to please others, or trying to avoid some pain, then it will be meaningful. If it lacks a sense of meaning or purpose, check in and see if it is really guided by your values.

•Adaptive: Does the goal help you to take your life forwards in a direction that, as far as you can predict, is likely to improve the quality of that life?

•Realistic: The goal should be realistically achievable. Take into account your health, competing demands on your time, financial status, and whether you have the skills to achieve it.

•Time-bound: to increase the specificity of your goal, set a day, date and time for it.

If this is not possible, set as accurate a time limit as you can.

The next step is to write down a graduated series of goals, starting from tiny simple goals that can be achieved right away, to long term goals that may not be achieved for months or years. ACT experts break it down in the following format:

  • set an immediate goal-something small, simple, easy, I can do in the next 24 hours
  • short term goals- things I can do over the next few days and weeks
  • medium term goals- things I can do over the next few weeks and months
  •  long term goals- things I can do over the next few months and years

Hopefully trying a different approach to a time-honored tradition leads to better success with achieving your goals. Cheers to a happy and healthy 2019, living your life in harmony with your values!

For more information about Acceptance and Commitment Therapy:

www.thehappinesstrap.com

https://contextualscience.org/act

Kelly Broadwater is a psychologist who uses ACT in her individual therapy and as a group facilitator. She helped develop the Mindful Living group series offered at Chrysalis, which is ACT and DBT informed. Her motto, informed by her values, is “Work hard, play hard”.


tree-1200x675.jpg

It’s that time of year with holiday feasts and parties galore. It’s also that time of year when you’ll hear lots of recommendations for tackling those festivities in a way that keeps excess weight at bay. Not all such advice is worth following. Here are nine of the worst holiday healthy eating recommendations, and how you should approach eating this season instead:

1. Wear tight or fitted clothes to a holiday party to prevent overeating.

You should be able to wear whatever makes you feel your best instead of letting food dictate your fashion choices. Your body’s hunger and satiety signals will work regardless of how you dress. The holidays are about connecting with family and friends, not being preoccupied with how uncomfortable you are.

2. Don’t eat all day to save all of your calories for the feast or party.

Not eating quality food with protein and fiber throughout the day is a surefire way to cause you to dive headfirst into the dip bowl because of extreme hunger. I always recommend having packed breakfast or brunch and a small snack like a hard-boiled egg or Greek yogurt with berries before leaving for your celebration. That way, you can take a more rational approach to the appetizers and avoid filling up too quickly on high-calorie and high-fat snacks.

3. Fill your plate with salad and crudités at the holiday buffet so you don’t overdo it.

This advice is just plan sad, plus it sets you up for a buffet binge later in the night when the cocktails may have kicked in. You can get baby carrots anytime! Instead, acknowledge your desire for something special and be mindful of your choices. Take a small portion of just those items that you can’t get at other times of the year or that are most special to you.

4. Don’t make a plate; you’ll eat less.

No! Make a plate. Fill your plate once so you know exactly how much you consumed and won’t be tempted to keep revisiting the buffet. Finger foods can be dangerous since you can easily walk by the buffet table and grab more than you realize. Before you know it, you are full of sausage balls, cheese cubes and cookies.

5. Go on a liquid cleanse the day before the feast or party to negate the excess calories consumed during that meal.

Depriving yourself of adequate meals prior to a day when mindful recipe options may not be available will lead to excessive eating because your body is seeking nutrients and food. You will find yourself overeating on this day to compensate for the lack of food the day prior. If you keep your meals balanced throughout the week, however, one day of splurging on that pumpkin pie and seconds on the gravy and stuffing will not hinder your health (or your weight).

6. Make a totally different version of your favorite holiday dish to reduce calories.

While using, for example, less butter or cream may not make a difference [in taste], if you make mashed cauliflower instead of grandma’s creamy mashed potato recipe that you only have once a year, you likely won’t feel satisfied. This ‘strategy’ not only takes away from a holiday tradition but can also lead to overeating on the food to attempt to feel more satisfied.

7. Eat more to prevent food from going to in the garbage.

While food waste is a big concern, there are other ways to put leftovers to use than eating them all in one sitting. Leftover turkey can be used to make sandwiches or a homemade turkey soup, while the extra vegetables and potatoes can be combined with eggs to create a colorful frittata.

8. You can work off all those extra calories with some exercise.

Just because you did a turkey trot doesn’t mean it’s a good idea to eat two turkey dinners and waddle home. It’s a great idea to keep up with your exercise routine during the entire holiday season but be careful not to use that as a constant reason to overindulge.

9. Skip the party!

Holidays are not about the food – they are about the friends, family and fun to be had with all. Live fulfilled and enjoy them! Food brings us together to nourish our bodies; people around us nourish our spirits and knowing you will be OK nourishes your mind. Keep yourself on track and embrace every holiday by practicing mindful eating.

Happy Holidays

Terri Mozingo, RD, LDN, CEDRD is a Certified Eating Disorder Registered Dietitian passionate about helping her clients achieve overall wellness.


About Us

At Chrysalis, we believe that a supportive, healing environment is essential in order for change and growth to occur. We seek to offer such an environment to clients and help them create that in their lives and relationships. Read More

Hours

Mon: 8AM - 6PM
Tue: 8AM - 6PM
Wed: 8AM - 6PM
Thu: 8AM - 6PM
Fri: 8AM - 4PM
Sat: CLOSED
Sun: CLOSED

© 2018 Chrysalis Center | Design Interventions